Type 2 diabetes & your heart What’s the connection?

 

 <div class="mid_txt">Diabetes causes plaque <br class="br767"><br class="br1024">buildup <br class="br1250">that can clog <br class="br767"><br class="br1024">arteries, <span class="red"><strong>leading to <br class="br1250">a <br class="br767"><br class="br1024">heart attack or stroke</strong></span></div>

Diabetes causes plaque buildup 
that can clog arteries, leading to 
a heart attack or stroke
<div class="mid_txt">If you have diabetes, <br class="br1024">you are <br class="br767">up <br class="br1250">to <span class="blue"><strong>4x more <br class="br1024">likely to <br class="br767"><br class="br1250">develop <br class="br1024">heart disease</strong></span></div>

If you have diabetes, you are up 
to 4x more likely to 
develop heart disease
 <div class="mid_txt">Heart disease is the<br class="br1024"><span class="red"><strong> #1 cause <br class="br767"><br class="br1250">of death</strong></span><br class="br1024"> in adults with <br class="br1250">type 2 <br class="br1024">diabetes</div>

Heart disease is the #1 cause 
of death
 in adults with 
type 2 diabetes
 <div class="mid_txt">In adults with type 2 <br class="br767"><br class="br1024">diabetes, <br class="br1250"><span class="blue"><strong>2 out of 3 <br class="br1024">deaths <br class="br767">are <br class="br1250">caused <br class="br1024">by heart disease</strong></span></div>

In adults with type 2 diabetes, 
2 out of 3 deaths are 
caused by heart disease

What foods are good for my heart? Posted in New Jersey Herald 1/9/2018

Bijal Dave, M.D., is a family physician specializing in diet-oriented treatment of chronic diseases and a medical staff member at Atlantic Health System’s Hackettstown Medical Center and Newton Medical Center

Q. What foods are good for my heart?

A. A heart-healthy diet is not only good for our heart but also for our waistline and our pockets in the long term. Eating certain foods on a regular basis can certainly reduce the risk of heart disease.

1. Turmeric — The yellow spice that gives Indian curries its distinct color has been known for its medicinal properties in the Indian subcontinent for thousands of years. Science is now backing up that curcumin, turmeric’s active compound, has plethora of health benefits.

a. It can benefit the heart in multiple ways. It has heavy duty antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet activity, which means it not only lowers inflammatory changes that are the root cause of heart disease, but it also acts as a blood thinner, which prevents clot formation in heart disease. It also helps in repair of cardiac muscle after a cardiac event occurs. Patients who have irregularity of cardiac muscle, known as cardiac arrhythmia, will benefit by regular intake of curcumin, as curcumin helps with regulation of calcium homeostasis in heart muscle which causes cardiac arrhythmias.

b. It is also helpful in patients who have already gone through heart surgery. Curcumin supplementation at certain amounts will reduce ischemia (i.e. reduced blood supply), injury or inflammation to the already-affected heart muscle.

c. Curcumin has super antioxidant activity is comparable to vitamin C and vitamin E and it also helps with improving blood flow through vessels. It is especially helpful in diabetics to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular complications such as heart failure. Curcumin extracts that contain black pepper have also been shown to reduce the LDL or bad cholesterol. Add turmeric to your foods or take a good quality curcumin extract daily to improve your heart health.

2. Fish – high in omega-3s such as Atlantic mackerel, salmon, sardines, herring, trout and cod liver oil should be consumed at least thrice weekly for optimum heart benefits. Omega-3 fatty acids may decrease triglycerides, lower blood pressure slightly, reduce blood clotting, decrease stroke and heart failure risk and reduce irregular heartbeats.

3. Nuts – Walnuts, almonds, pistachios … munch on a handful of them, a couple of times a week and you will be doing the old ticker a big favor. In addition to packing a protein punch, nuts are great sources of PUFAs and MUFAs, which help lower the bad cholesterol. They are also rich in fiber and plant sterols, which reduces cholesterol; vitamin E, which helps reduce the development of plaque in arteries; and L-argininie, which improves the flexibility of arterial walls, thereby reducing incidence of narrowing and less prone to blood clots.

4. Berries – Berries are chock full of heart healthy phytonutrients such as polyphenols and fiber, which are very helpful in preventing heart disease. They have a heavy dose of antioxidants, which makes them a sweet medicine indeed for prevention of cardiac disease.

5. Chia seeds – ground flax seeds and hemps seeds in that order are omega-3 powerhouses and should be consumed on a daily basis. Just add them to your salad, smoothie or cereal to ensure optimal heart health.

Coronary Angioplasty

couple

A coronary angioplasty is a procedure performed to improve blood flow in the arteries of the heart, by re-opening or enlarging blocked blood vessels. The blockages usually develop as a result of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis occurs when plaque builds up on the inner walls of the arteries and causes them to harden and narrow, often leading to coronary artery disease. A coronary angioplasty involves the insertion of a tiny balloon that is inflated to open and widen the artery. It is often combined with the insertion of a small wire tube called a stent, that helps to keep the artery open, so it will not narrow again in the future.

Candidates For A Coronary Angioplasty

A coronary angioplasty may be recommended for people with with blockages in the arteries of their heart, especially if they are experiencing chest pain and discomfort. It may also be performed if lifestyle changes and medication have not been an effective form of treatment and after an individual has suffered from a heart attack.

The Coronary Angioplasty Procedure

Patients are often sedated but remain awake during the procedure. During the angioplasty procedure, an incision is made in the arm or groin, and a catheter is inserted. A contrast dye is injected through the catheter, to highlight the clogged areas during the procedure. A tube with a deflated balloon is inserted through the catheter to the blockage. The balloon is inflated to widen the artery, pushing the plaque aside allow the blood to flow through smoothly. To hold the artery open and prevent it from narrowing again, a wire mesh tube called a stent may be inserted. Some stents are coated with medication that is slowly released into the arteries to help prevent scar tissue from forming and blocking the artery. The coronary angioplasty takes approximately 1 to 2 hours to perform.

Recovery From Coronary Angioplasty

After the procedure, patients are required to stay in the hospital for a few hours so that their condition can be monitored. Some patients may stay in the hospital overnight for observation. The site where the catheter was inserted is checked for bleeding and patients may experience soreness or tenderness in the area. Medication is prescribed to to help prevent blood clots from forming. Patients are often able to return to work approximately one week after the angioplasty procedure. Cardiac rehabilitation may be recommended after a coronary angioplasty. Patients are encouraged to make certain lifestyle changes after this procedure to lower their risk of coronary artery disease. Life style modifications may include exercise, quitting smoking, losing weight and reducing stress.

Risks Of Coronary Angioplasty

While a coronary angioplasty is considered a common medical procedure, complications are rare, however they may include:

  • Blood clots
  • Bleeding
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Allergic reaction to contrast dye
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke

The risk of complications is higher in people over the age of 65, people with extensive heart disease and blockages in their coronary arteries, and individuals with chronic kidney disease.